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How To Clean Upholstered Furniture?

How To Clean Upholstered Furniture?
  • Olivia White
  • Oct 21 2019
Upholstered furniture is a perfect blend of comfort, style and luxury, and it can single-handedly enhance the beauty of your room. It gives a stunning appearance as well as an inviting appeal to your home.

However, a lot of time, effort and a correct cleaning approach are required to maintain its sophisticated look. To clean this type of furniture, people often choose a reputed company that offers end of lease cleaning in Melbourne.

It is undoubtedly the best way to maintain its elegant beauty. These professionals have advanced tools and knowledge to clean the upholstered furniture perfectly.

However, with the right tools and proper guidance, you can also clean it on your own. Vacuuming, steaming, and spot cleaning will help you to keep it spick and span. Here is the complete procedure of cleaning your upholstered furniture flawlessly. Have a look!

Step 1: Vacuuming the Upholstered Furniture


Before starting the cleaning procedure, it is essential to vacuum your furniture and get rid of the loose dust and debris. This step will help you to clean the surface properly. Follow these steps to vacuum it properly.

Get Rid Of Debris before Using a Vacuum Cleaner

You can easily remove large debris from your furniture using the fingers. Before you use a vacuum cleaner, also check the crevices in your upholstered furniture for foreign matter. Such things can clog your machine, so remove them properly. At last, brush off loose dirt or extra dust and then vacuum it.

Use an Upholstery Attachment While Vacuuming

Many vacuum cleaners come with an attachment for upholstered furniture. If you also have one, then definitely use it. If you don’t have, then go for the one that is closest to the one you need.

Vacuum It Properly

While vacuuming the furniture, use short strokes from left to right. Start it from the top of the furniture and work your way down. This way, you will be able to remove the dust properly, particularly from materials like velvet.

In case you have delicate items like silk and linen, set the suction to its lowest level. If you don’t want to take any risk or don’t have the right tools, opt for end of lease cleaning in Melbourne.

Step 2: Remove Stains from Your Upholstered Furniture


After removing dust and grime from the uppermost layer of the furniture, get rid of the stains. There are different ways to tackle stains. Some of them are here:

Clean the Spills Immediately

If anything spills on your furniture, clean the spot immediately. Otherwise, it will go deep inside the fabric to become a stain. Take a soft piece of cloth and blot up the spill.

People often rub the spills, but that is a mistake because it will only spread the spill. Blotting will minimise the chances of spreading.

Go For the Most Appropriate Cleaning Approach

All the upholstered furniture comes along with a tag, and this tag helps you to know the cleaning recommendations. The tag says whether you can clean it with water and water-based solution, dry-cleaning or you need professional help.

That is why people do not take any chances and opt for end of lease cleaning in Melbourne as they have the expertise to deal with such furnishings.

Remove Stains Using Mild Dish Soap

If the fabric of your furniture can be cleaned using water and water-based solution, use any mild dish soap. Mix one-fourth cup of soap in one cup of warm water. Stir it properly until it gets foamy.

Take a piece of cloth and dip some part into the solution and squeeze it. Then dab it on any spots or stains. Then use a dry cloth to remove excess water and soap from that area.

Remove Stains Using hydrogen peroxide

You can also clean the spills and stubborn stains using 3% hydrogen peroxide. Use a soft piece of cloth to apply it on your furniture. But before you apply it, spot test the upholstery with hydrogen peroxide. Pick a spot like the underside of the furniture, which is not easily visible.

Remove Stains Using Vinegar

Vinegar is also a great household product to clean the stains from your furniture. Pour some white vinegar over a piece of a soft cloth and dab it directly on the spot.

If you want a milder alternative, with equal parts water. Allow the vinegar to soak into the spot for 10 to 15 minutes, and then you can blot it dry. Do not forget to spot-test it.

Step 3: Steaming your Upholstered Furniture


Before you use steam on your furniture, make sure that it won’t shrink the fabric. Talk to the manufacturer, supplier or read the label.

If it says that you cannot use water-based solutions, avoid steaming. Contact a reputed company offering budget end of lease cleaning in Melbourne. Their professionals are aware of the right cleaning techniques. If it allows you for steaming, follow the procedure given below.

Use a Steam Cleaner On the Surface of the Furniture

Use your steam cleaner on the furniture surface properly so that it can cover as much area as possible. Spend more time on those spots which are dirty. If there is any specific area that is hard to clean, you can use microfiber pad attachments or a scrub brush.

Using a brush removes the dirt that the steam has loosened. If you don’t have a steam cleaner, you can rent it from any nearby hardware store in Melbourne.

Use steam Iron on Your Upholstered Furniture

You can also use an iron that has a steaming facility. Pour water in your iron and set the heat temperature that is suitable for the fabric of your furniture.

For instance, if you have delicate fabrics like silk or anything made of synthetic materials, use a low heat setting. And if it is cotton, you can use higher heat. Use a brush to get rid of any debris that has loosened due to the steam.

Endnote


To clean your upholstered furniture, you need a little knowledge, a lot of time and most importantly, the right cleaning supplies. If you follow the method mentioned here, you are most likely to get a positive result. But if you don’t want to take a chance with your expensive belongings, contact the professional cleaners.